I was born and raised in Easton Pa., a small town north of Philadelphia. I was the school photographer in high school and college and did some part time work with local studios and newspapers . Although I considered studying photography, my parents talked me out of that and I majored instead, in psychology. My life has always involved a balance of my interests in photography and psychology.

During this period the Vietnam war made it essential for me to remain in school if I wanted to avoid the draft. So, I continued in school and had my Ph.D. in psychology by the time I was 26. While teaching social psychology at the University of Pennsylvania , my students suggested volunteering at a free clinic in downtown Philadelphia. This was the hippie era, and the free clinic was at the center of the counterculture in the city. My colleages and clients at the clinic helped change my way of looking at the world, and soon my life was changing in many ways. I began to take photographs again, this time approaching the experience as art rather than journalism. My teaching changed, and I began offering courses in the psychology of consciousness, Eastern philosophy and mysticism. I began to meditate and to follow the lessons of the Tao te Ching.

I was trying to bring together my varied interests and to show in art the ideas that I was teaching – namely that we have a choice as to how we perceive the world. The idea for the bodyscapes came out of this. I continued to pursue my psychology career at the National Science Foundation and Boston University, while also shooting and exhibiting the bodyscapes. I left academics in 1981 to pursue a full time art career. but I still teach occasional courses and workshops and am currently pursuing research on autism.

My work has been exhbited and sold at galleries, art festivals and exhibitions nationwide, for many years. I owned and operated my own gallery in Woodstock NY and that experience helped me to understand the art world from the gallery perspective. I have collaborated with my son , Carl Teger, in producing lenticular bodyscapes where the object such as a motorcycle appears to move across the body as the viewer walks past.

The work shown on the current website is a collection of new images from 2017. These images are only available through galleries.